Immigration

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

A representative of the White House addressed advocates in Dayton Thursday about their efforts to make immigrants welcome, but immigration reform was the elephant in the room.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen

Representatives from more than a dozen rust belt cities are gathering in Dayton Thursday to talk about immigration and economic development. The “Welcoming Economies” conference will include a keynote speech by Felicia Escobar, Special Assistant to the President for Immigration Policy.

This week, a free screening of the new documentary film, Vanishing Borders will take place at the Madden Hills Library in Dayton. The film gives viewers a look into the lives of four immigrant women living in New York City and transforming their communities. Then after the film, director and producer, Alexandra Hidalgo, will discuss the documentary with author Katrina Kittle and member of the audience. Kittle is a former teacher and mentor of Hidalgo's.

Nube with her teenage daughter, Kimberly. latino
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Nube’s trying to get her kids out the door to school. Her six-year-old comes running down the stairs; her 15-year-old is up in the bedroom getting dressed. She and her children aren’t even five feet tall, but they fill up the kitchen bustling around trying to eat and get ready.

Nube is a compact woman with a wide smile—and she came a long way to Dayton. We’re not using Nube’s full name because she asked us to withhold it for her protection.

 

“I’m trying to forget about this forever”

Ohio Ranks Last In Policies For Undocumented Immigrants

Apr 20, 2015

When it comes to how well states provide for the health of undocumented immigrants, Ohio ranks as the worst in the country, according to a new report released this week.

The University of California’s Global Health Institute analyzed state laws and policies, such as health insurance coverage and workplace protections.

Javier is a star student in Rick Seither's automotive class at David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center. But he's not sure whether he can go on to college.  latino
Jonathan Platt / WYSO

Inside a huge garage at the David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center, there are ten or so cars in different stages of being fixed, and about a dozen hydraulic lifts. Instructor Rick Seither calls his students over for a mini-lesson.

Columbia City Blog

Ohio's elections chief says a review by his office found that 145 non-citizens were registered to vote, with 27 casting ballots in previous elections in the battleground state.

Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted said Thursday that those who voted have been referred to the state's attorney general for further investigation.

Husted told reporters at a news conference that there's no evidence suggesting that the non-citizens' votes impacted the outcomes of 70 recent nail-biting contests.

Obama
BLOOMBERG

Tonight President Obama will announce executive actions he will take on immigration. He is expected to offer deportation protection and work visas for millions of people in the country illegally, but it is unclear just how many people would be covered by the action.

Whatever that number is, tomorrow many of them will be asking “Ok, so what do I do now?”

City of Dayton / The Olhmann Group

Soccer fever swept around the globe in June during the World Cup playoffs. At the time, many local businesses saw a positive economic impact as fans gathered in restaurants and bars to watch the tournament.

On Friday and Saturday, world soccer is back—at least in the Miami Valley—as players from Dayton’s immigrant communities take to the field.

City of Dayton Youth Services Director Joe Parlette says the games were born out of the Welcome Dayton initiative.

A controversy could be fizzling out over whether Dayton will host immigrant children from Central America in temporary shelters. The federal government told Mayor Nan Whaley it might not need the help, after all.

Pages