History

Commentary
6:30 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Orville Wright's Demonstration Flight

The Flyer on the launch rail, the catapult behind the aeroplane.

In the summer of 1908, Wilbur Wright astonished the world, demonstrating the Wright Flyer in France.  No one had ever flown as long and with such control.  The world took notice.

Back here in the states, that same summer, Orville Wright was making demonstration flights, too, for the US Army's Signal Corps, trying to get a contract to sell planes to the US government.  Dayton aviation historian and photographer Dan Patterson tells the story.

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Origins Podcast
10:00 am
Sun April 15, 2012

Climate, Human Population and Human Survival: What the Deep Past Tells Us about the Future

The melting of glaciers due to global warming is threatening fresh water supplies to human populations in a number of regions. Shown here: Canada's Athabasca Glacier.

The controversies generated by climate science in recent years center around the human relationship with the natural world and with natural resources. This month, historian John Brooke puts that critical question in historical perspective—deep historical perspective. For most of human history, our species had to struggle to survive powerful natural forces, like climate and disease. In the past three centuries, however, things have changed dramatically: that struggle has been reshaped by the unprecedented growth of the human population—from under one billion to now over seven.

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Military
10:00 am
Thu March 15, 2012

A Century of U.S. Relations with Iraq

The statue of Saddam Hussein topples in Baghdad's Firdos Square on April 9, 2003.

As the American combat mission in Iraq comes to end, the Obama administration and Pentagon officials have repeatedly assured the world that American involvement with Iraq will continue. They are undoubtedly right. Since the founding of Iraq in the aftermath of World War I, U.S. policy has included cooperation, confrontation, war, and, most recently, an ongoing experiment in state-building. This month, Peter Hahn, an expert on the history of U.S.

Origins Podcast
9:00 am
Thu December 15, 2011

Conserving Diversity at the Dinner Table: Plants, Food Security and Gene Banks

In the last fifty years, global agricultural practices have favored growing ever fewer varieties of high-yielding crops, leading to fears that the loss of genetic diversity in food leaves the growing human population exposed to risks of food shortages.

With the ongoing East African drought crisis, the persisting threat of global climate change, and the world population now estimated at 7 billion, global concerns about food insecurity are again in the news. Little mentioned, however, is the continuing loss of genetic diversity of the foods we eat today—a trend that has rapidly accelerated since the twentieth century and that raises troubling questions about the vulnerability of the world’s food supply.

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Radio Drama
3:09 pm
Thu October 21, 2010

Dangerous Women

Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Library of Congress
  • Hear Dangerous Women in its entirety.

To commemorate the anniversary of the 19th amendment to the constitution, WYSO 91.3 FM and the Living History Theatre presents an original radio drama, "Dangerous Women." This original work by Yellow Springs playwright Kay Reimers, concerns the beginning and end of the nearly century long struggle to give women the right to vote.

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