Health

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Abortion clinics in Dayton and Toledo might be forced to close by tightening state regulations. New provisions in the governor’s budget signed into law Tuesday evening could make it harder for abortion providers to stay open.

Researchers from Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine are part of a new research team that will study craniofacial growth in pediatric patients

The research team will actually study how children’s facial structures grow. The comprehensive study will be the largest of its kind and is eventually expected to provide orthodontists and surgeons with precise diagnostic tools—for children who may simply need braces, or those with severe abnormalities of the face or head caused by birth defects, disease or trauma.   

Congressman Mike Turner at Delphi Hearing in 2013
WYSO

Former employees of auto parts company Delphi, including many in the Dayton area, are working to get a health care tax credit back on the agenda in Congress. About 20,000 people, many of them in Ohio, lost health care and part of their pensions during the GM bankruptcy in 2009; Delphi spun off from GM in 1999, but pensions and health care remained intertwined for employees of the parts-maker.

Bike Miami Valley

A $1 million bike share project was announced by Bike Miami Valley and the Greater Dayton RTA Thursday morning.  

Laura Estandia with Bike Miami Valley says the goal of the program, known as “Link”, is to promote more active lifestyles in the city.

“This is a transportation tool for downtown that’s going to link together different areas of interest...it’s going to do a lot for the connectivity of our region,” she said.

A screen shot from healthcare.gov, the website for the Affordable Care Act health plans.
WCPN

A report released today finds more than 202,000 Ohio residents have signed up during this open enrollment period. That’s more than 45,000 more than the number who enrolled last time around through the federal marketplace.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says about 12,000 people in the Dayton area have signed up in the last three months.

Children's Hospital of Dayton

Health coverage for 130,000 Ohio children through the Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP is set to expire later this year. 

Ohio's Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown was at Dayton Children’s Hospital on Monday to announce his plans for extending the CHIP program set to expire in September. Brown says he’ll be the lead sponsor of legislation to address the issue.

State Says Ohio Flu Hospitalizations Decreasing

Jan 23, 2015
Health officials say most of the cases are actually the flu, and there are no known cases of ebola in Ohio.
samantha celera / Flickr/Creative Commons

State health officials are reporting a decrease in the number of flu-related hospitalizations in what has been an unusually bad season.
 
Numbers released Friday by the Ohio Department of Health showed 692 flu-related hospitalizations from Jan. 11 to Jan. 17, a significant drop from the previous week's figure of 1,623 hospitalizations.
 
The new data brings the season's total hospitalizations to 6,798. The state, which does not report adult flu deaths, has recorded the deaths of four children. Individual county health departments have reported several adult deaths.

Antwaun Brown is currently uninsured, and doesn't know yet whether he'll be able to get covered by the ACA. medicaid insurance health
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

It’s been a year now since Ohio expanded the low income health insurance program known as Medicaid, and enrollment exceeded expectations.

PHDMC

Public Health Dayton & Montgomery County (PHDMC) has been awarded funding from the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) through 2019 to support programming. Awards of $125,000 a year, beginning in 2015, will go toward Public Health’s Creating Healthy Communities (CHC) programs to promote healthier lifestyles. CHC programs run statewide and through the ODH.

Ohio’s infant mortality rate is dismal, near the bottom among all states. As the Ohio Department of Health this week holds a summit to focus attention on the problem, a children’s hospital in Central Ohio has turned to some adult medications to keep more premature infants alive.

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