Great Dayton Flood of 1913

Arthur Morgan’s Simple Yet Elegant Solution

Mar 28, 2014
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

101 years ago this week, it rained in Dayton. And rained some more. And it kept on raining. It was the Great Dayton Flood. Today though, because of a man named Arthur E. Morgan, communities from Piqua to Hamilton have little to fear from the rising floodwaters of the Great Miami River. 

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for May 19, 2013 including the following stories:

- In this week's PoliticsOhio, Jerry Kenney speaks with former Ohio House member Seth Morgan about the recent news that the IRS targeted conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status.

- Study: Ohio Superintendents Support the Common Core, by Emily McCord.

- The Great Flood: Out of Devastation Comes Innovation

The May 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Kurt Rinehart from the Miami Conservancy on how the great Dayton food prompted innovation in the Miami Valley.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

 

One century ago, during the final week of March 1913, severe weather caused death and destruction across a wide swath of the Midwest. In Omaha a tornado outbreak wrecked thousands of buildings and claimed many lives. The bad weather was headed east.

Rising waters from heavy rains caused severe flooding. In places like Indianapolis, Columbus, Portsmouth, Middletown, and hundreds of other towns the floodwaters breached levees, swept away buildings, and left thousands homeless.

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for March 24, 2013 including the following stories:

-Jerry Kenney reports on the impending unpaid furlough days for civilian employees of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

-Statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen reports on Governor John Kasich's stance on gay marriage.

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100 years ago today (March 25th, 1913), after a week that saw high winds, falling temperatures and heavy rains, Dayton Police sounded sirens, warning residents of a weakening levee system. Estimates say the river was flowing at an unprecedented 100,000 cubic feet per second.

The University of Dayton is unveiling their new RiverMobile, a mobile learning studio that puts the region's five rivers on 18 wheels. 

RiverMobile is a traveling exhibit converted from a semi-trailer that highlights one of our greatest local resources, the Great Miami River watershed.  the mobile unit was built by students in the University's Rivers Institute, and local donors provided a lot of support for the project. It's being unveiled this morning as part of the sixth-annual River Summit at the University of Dayton River Campus. 

Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Photographer Andy Snow has done some amazing work replicating camera camera shots of photographs of the 1913 Dayton Flood.  They're part of the Dayton Art Institute's 100 year anniversary exhibit that opened this weekend. They will also be featured in a new book by Andy that will be released in March.  WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Andy at the media premiere of DAI's Dayton Flood Exhibit. In this interview Andy talks about how the project started and what he learned from it.

Library of Congress

One hundred years ago this week, the citizens of Dayton, Ohio and surrounding communities watched in disbelief as collapsing levees allowed flood waters to overtake the city in a matter of moments.    

WYSO and the Living History Theatre present an original radio drama, "The End of Emerald Street."  Set during the Great Dayton Flood, the story combines fictional characters with historical figures like John H. Patterson, Arthur Morgan, and John Barringer.