Gas Drilling

Manufacturing Group Says Drilling Is Paying Off

Feb 4, 2014

The relative boom in manufacturing in Northeast Ohio over the last two years has had a lot to do with natural gas prices and infrastructure. according to a new report on manufacturing that looks at what’s happened to Northeast Ohio jobs over the last two years and what’s likely to continue.

The report by Cleveland State University for the Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network says manufacturing jobs, wages, exports and regional product all grew – with the jobs at better than double the national rate.

Some environmental groups and eastern Ohio residents say the state is hurrying permits for gas processing plants amid the shale drilling boom.

They say fast-tracking some permit requests prevents examination of local concerns about air and water pollution from refineries and the fracking process that frees the gas. Ohio Environmental Council lobbyist Jack Shaner says the state is bending over backward to accommodate the industry.

A top lobbyist for Ohio's oil and gas drilling industry is urging state lawmakers to support a package of tax revisions advanced as an alternative to an earlier plan by Republican Gov. John Kasich.

At a packed hearing Wednesday, Ohio Oil and Gas Association executive vice president Tom Stewart supported a bill introduced last month. It would raise the severance tax rate on horizontally drilled wells by 1 percent, then 2 percent, while rolling back similar taxes on traditional wells.

Shale Drilling Permits Higher Than Expected In 2013

Dec 17, 2013

2013 ends with more than twice as many shale drilling permits issued for the Utica Shale play than first expected, encouraging news for Ohio backers of natural gas exploration and production.

Earlier this year, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources projected 525 permits for shale drilling.  That would’ve been a modest increase from 2012’s total of 376, but now in its most recent report, the state DNR shows 1015 permits issued to 30 companies since 2009, operating in much of eastern Ohio. 

The amount of waste from the shale gas and oil drilling process injected into disposal wells in Ohio is continuing to rise.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources says that 14.2 million barrels of fluids and other waste from the process of hydraulic fracturing - or fracking - were injected into disposal wells in the state in 2012. That was up 12 percent from the previous year.

An important study on possible health impacts of natural gas drilling is still looking for additional funding.

Geisinger Health System spokeswoman Amanda O'Rourke said Wednesday the $1 million grant that was announced in February 2012 remains the only funding for a project that was projected to cost at least $25 million.

Geisinger plans to look at health histories of hundreds of thousands of patients who live near Marcellus Shale gas wells in Pennsylvania. Geisinger is based in Danville.

Officials say drilling in Ohio's Utica shale region nearly doubled the output of oil and natural gas there since 2011.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources announced Thursday that the drilling process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the shale region of eastern Ohio increased the oil output by 93 percent and the natural gas output by 80 percent in that time.

Workers, employers and lobbyists for Ohio's growing oil and gas industry have made a showing at the Statehouse to tout the industry's economic benefits.

The lobbying event Wednesday drew more than 200 industry representatives and 75 lawmakers. It was sponsored by the Ohio Oil & Gas Association, the Ohio Petroleum Council and the Ohio Shale Coalition.

Participants urged lawmakers to expand natural gas development in Ohio. They cited a study by research firm IHS that found 38,000 oil and natural gas-related jobs were created in Ohio last year.

The oil and gas boom has brought in lots of activity to eastern Ohio, and perhaps lots of out of state workers. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports says that’s a problem for the governor.

Gov. John Kasich has joked several times about the people he wants to see working with the oil and gas industry in Ohio, including in his State of the State speech in February.

A newspaper reports that injection drilling in Ohio hasn't met the initial expectations of state officials this year.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that Ohio Department of Natural Resources officials had told state legislators in March that as many as 250 of the natural-gas and oil wells would be drilled in eastern Ohio Utica shale by the end of the year.

But state records show that only 165 wells have been completed, with 22 more being drilled.

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