Environment

In An Ohio Town, Officials Waited Months To Disclose Dangerous Lead Levels

Jan 29, 2016
bottled Water distribution at the Sebring Community Center in northeast Ohio.
Julie Grant / Allegheny Front

At the community center in tiny Sebring, Ohio, it’s clear there’s something going on. There are trucks from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. People are wearing official-looking fluorescent yellow jackets. The Red Cross is here. And residents are picking up bottled water.

 

The Yellow Springs in winter glen helen
Talitha Green / Glen Helen

Today WYSO Curious takes on a question that’s simple, but also age-old. It involves a feature familiar to Yellow Springs locals: the actual springs after which the town is named.

The springs inside a preserve called Glen Helen look bright yellowish orange where the water comes out. So listener Jonathan Kouse, an occasional visitor to the Glen, asked, “Why are the Yellow Springs yellow?”

 

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

  TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's environmental regulators are ordering two wastewater treatment plants in southwest Ohio to reduce the amount of phosphorus that goes into the Great Miami River.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency last month rejected a request from Dayton and Montgomery County to delay setting the limits.

The state EPA says its research shows the plants are sending too much phosphorus into the river during the summer and that can add up to more toxic algae blooms.

Future Of Coal Debated In Columbus

Jan 7, 2016
Flickr Creative Commons user Bill Herndon

Who should be paying to keep power plants afloat that are inefficient and don’t do very well in the market—the utility company or its customers?

That's the question under hot debate in Columbus as major utility AEP fights to keep several of its coal plants open through 2030. 

Jerry Kenney

Cooler temperatures are here and Ohio honeybees are heading indoors—into their hives where they’ll spend the next few months keeping their queens safe and warm.

Dayton Power & Light

Continuing their Right Tree, Right Place program this fall, DP&L is reminding residents how important selecting the right tree is when planting close to power lines. 

With both environmental and safety concerns in mind, DP&L says “trees are an important part of the environment that beautify our neighborhoods and communities,” and also says that “trees too close to power lines can become a hazard and contribute to power outages.”

Lake Erie Algae Blooms May Have Peaked For Season

Sep 28, 2015
Satellite view of toxic algal bloom on Lake Erie
NASA Earth Observatory

The algae blooms in Lake Erie around Northeast Ohio may have reached their peak for the season. Heavy spring rains washed large amounts of phosphorous into the lake prompting concerns of serious toxic algae problems.

Laura Johnson, a researcher at the National Center for Water Quality Research at Heidelberg University in northwest Ohio, believes the algae peak has passed, citing shorter days, cooler temperatures and much of the phosphorous in the water being used up.  Johnson says the only thing that could possibly cause the algae blooms to re-generate would be very heavy rain.

Stewart Morris / Flickr Creative Commons

Images of Pope Francis can be found on everything from beer cans to t-shirts leading up to his US visit. But why all the excitement? And what is it about his recent pronouncements on the environment and social justice that have drawn attention from everyone...not just Catholics? University of Dayton Professor Bob Brecha explains with this week’s Climate Commentary.

Columbus Launches Campaign To Plant More Trees In City

Sep 16, 2015
Honavery

The city of Columbus has paired with 20 nonprofits to launch a campaign aimed at bringing more green to Ohio's capital city.
 
The Columbus Dispatch reports "Branch Out Columbus" will plant 300,000 medium-sized trees throughout the city by 2020.
 
Columbus' tree canopy currently covers 22 percent of the city. Mayor Michael Coleman said Tuesday the initiative will grow that number to 27 percent, and that he's shooting for 31 percent.
 

Dayton Water Great Miami River
Texas141

A new report calls for the creation of a $250 million trust to fund water protection in Ohio.

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