Energy Efficiency

Tech Companies Breaking Up With ALEC Over Climate Change

Oct 13, 2014
A Paulding County wind farm. Ohio Republicans connected to ALEC sponsored a bill to roll back the state's renewable energy standards.
David Grant / Flickr/Creative Commons

Many big tech companies are breaking up with the national organization ALEC, or the American Legislative Exchange Council. ALEC is a group geared towards crafting free-market-based model legislation that’s introduced into state legislatures, usually by conservative Republicans—and Ohio is now caught in the middle of the dispute.

Coal is shipped by barge down the Ohio River.
MoToMo / Flickr

A bill that puts the state’s renewable energy standards on hold for two years is headed to Ohio governor John Kasich’s desk. That comes just as the federal government has proposed new limits on emissions from power plants.

A bill that would put a hold on Ohio’s energy efficiency and renewable standards is making its way through the state legislature after late-night passage in the state senate last Thursday. While opponents of the 2008 standards say they are costly for consumers, some are arguing the current standards are good for business and save money in the long run.

Portman’s Energy Bill Is Grounded By Unrelated Amendments

Dec 20, 2013

A bipartisan energy efficiency bill sponsored by Republican Ohio Sen. Rob Portman is going nowhere this year.The Shaheen-Portman bill sets targets and establishes programs to boost energy efficiency for government and commercial buildings, and manufacturers. It has bipartisan support and was considered a major piece of energy legislation that had a chance.

The October 2013 installment of SOCHE TALKS features Doug Riehle, director of physical plant and facilities at Edison Community College speaking on Practical and Cost Effective Energy Conservation Measures.

The SOCHE Talks are a collaboration with the Southwest Ohio Council for Higher Education. In this monthly series we’ll hear from faculty and staff from areas colleges and universities on a wide variety of subjects. It's an effort to bring Miami Valley research and thinking into the public arena – a way to enlighten the world with local knowledge.

An expanding program in clean and renewable energy at the University of Dayton is exceeding enrollment expectations and drawing students from around the world.

The program at UD has swelled to three times the school's expectations for enrollment since it was launched in 2009.

Among its 50 students, the program has three Fulbright scholars - a record for any one program at the university.  Fulbright scholars are international students chosen for their academics and leadership potential.

Environmental activists and consumer advocates are breathing a sigh of relief. Ohio lawmakers apparently are NOT going to change the state’s energy efficiency program during the last days of the current legislative session.

The program requires electric companies to lower overall power usage by giving money to people and businesses that buy energy-saving appliances and equipment. To fund the program, all electricity customers pay a surcharge on their monthly electric bills.

Ohio consumer advocates and environmentalists have been worrying out loud that state legislators might water down or wipe out a 4-year old program that encourages electricity customers to be more energy-efficient. Now, as statehouse correspondent Bill Cohen reports --- some comments by the top man in the Ohio Senate show those activists have good REASON to worry.

Energy efficiency advocates hold a rally in Columbus today (Monday). They want to keep pressure on legislators to maintain requirements for utilities to cut the amount of electricity that customers consume and increase their use of alternative energy sources. Michelle Kanu from member station WCPN has more.