Education

Early childhood education may get a boost in the state budget. A group of lawmakers are meeting today to discuss adding a voucher program that will help eligible children attend private preschools. The Education Finance Subcommittee will be hearing testimony from local educators, business people and community leaders. There are 130,000 children in Ohio eligible to attend government funded preschool programs. Fewer than half of them receive preschool services.  

The University of Dayton says its high number of alcohol violations among students has more to do with aggressive enforcement than excessive drinking.

The Dayton Daily News reports that UD's more than 3,500 alcohol violations over a three-year period outpaced much larger Ohio schools.

The 8,000-student university's disciplinary referrals for drinking trailed only the much-larger Ohio State University among the state's colleges from 2009 to 2011, the period for which the latest data is available.

Wittenberg University's Concerned Black Students group held its 45th annual Walkout event this week. The event commemorates a 1969 incident when 38 of the school's 45 black students walked off campus when they alleged the university failed to address their concerns about unequal treatment.

Early Childhood Education Programs Impacted by Sequestration

Apr 18, 2013

Head Start is an early childhood education program that serves low-income and at-risk families and families that have children with disabilities. The recent sequestration is requiring Head Start programs across the state to cut their funding by 5.3 percent and that could mean big changes to the services it provides. Barbara Haxton is the Executive Director of the Ohio Head Start Association. She says that next year the Miami Valley could lose as many as 300 slots for children in local Head Start programs. 

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for April 14, 2013 including the following stories:

-- Dayton Police Chief: Aerial Surveillance For Crime, Not Spying, by Emily McCord

-- Canal's Street's Montgomery Says Venue Has Been His Life, by Jerry Kenney

On Tuesday, Republicans in the Ohio House put forth a budget proposal that included an education funding formula quite different than the one Governor John Kasich put forward in his two year spending blueprint. 

Many welcomed the news that, under Governor Kasich’s plan, no schools would see their funding levels cut from the previous year. Yet, 60% of Ohio schools would get no funding increase, including some poorer districts, and some wealthy districts would have seen fairly large funding increases.

A new association is lobbying for better benefits and bargaining rights for part-time faculty at Ohio's public universities.

The Ohio Part-Time Faculty Association also wants to boost pay for these adjunct professors, who make up about two-thirds of the state's public university faculty.

The Akron Beacon Journal reports Thursday that Youngstown State University has the most part-time faculty, while the University of Akron has more than 1,000 part-time professors.

Ohio Public Radio

The Republicans in the legislature dealt several blows to Governor Kasich yesterday, including major revisions in his school funding formula. StateImpact Ohio’s Ida Lieszkovszky has this report on what those changes could mean for Ohio’s schools.

When Governor John Kasich announced his new school-funding proposal, most superintendents around the state were relieved to hear no one would get a funding cut. And there was also a lot of cheering when Kasich said his new formula would mean rich schools got less and poor schools got more.

An Ohio-based gun rights group says two dozen Ohio educators have been trained in firearms use in a pilot program developed after the slayings of children and staff members at a Connecticut school.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that participants in the three-day course used model guns with plastic pellets while learning tactical maneuvers for reacting to school shooters. The Armed Teacher Training Program conducted by the Tactical Defense Institute in southern Ohio's West Union included simulated gunman scenarios based on real-life situations.

Miami University says two students have been dismissed from school for tampering with grades.

The southwest Ohio school says its information security department and campus police were alerted at the end of last semester by a teacher who said grades online didn't match her paper copy. Investigation found that students used a device to record teachers' keystrokes, allowing them to obtain faculty usernames and passwords.

Police say one student has been charged with six misdemeanor counts related to breaching university computer systems, and the other was charged with three.

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