Education

Common Core Curriculum Debated In Columbus

Aug 19, 2014
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The set of education standards known as Common Core is under attack just as schools around Ohio begin to implement it. Hearings began this week on a bill to repeal the standards in Columbus.

The Common Core is a set of benchmarks created by a group of education experts from around the country, including some from Ohio, in 2010. The standards were then adopted by the state along with more than 40 others.

Robert Hill, superintendent of Firelands Local Schools in Lorain County, says a great deal of research went into crafting the standards.

Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
Paradox 56 / Flickr Creative Commons

A few dozen school-age students joined a union-backed coalition at the Ohio Statehouse Wednesday for a small but vocal protest against “zero tolerance” policies that result in kids being kicked out of school.

  The group, which included some students who’d been suspended or expelled from elementary school, held up signs reading “give kids second chances” and “more help less punishment”.

Molly Shack with the Ohio Student Association says the worst stories she’s heard involve suspensions at schools she says are underfunded and under-resourced.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The city of Dayton and the Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) have announced they’re extending the hours for student bus passes. Student bus passes have only been good through 4:30pm; now a $30 monthly pass will last until 5pm, and the $40 pass will be good through 7pm on weekdays.

The city has found transportation is a problem for a lot of kids who want to participate in tutoring and other after-school activities.

Wilberforce University was set to name a new president this week, but the selected candidate turned down the offer, and now a new search is underway.

Dwayne Smith, vice-president of academic affairs at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Mo, was offered the job to become the school's 20th president at an alumni conference in Memphis. But the head of the Wilberforce Faculty Association, Richard Deering, indicated that Smith balked at the offer after learning he was not the university's first choice.

Antioch College's Speech and Debate Club Soars

Jun 28, 2014

The Antioch College Speech and Debate Club has made many accomplishments since it was created in 2012. Wyatt Souers talked to Admissions Director, and one of the founders of the group, Micah Canal, as well debate team member Amelia Gonzalez '17 and founding debate team member Sarah Goldstein '16. Listen in to hear all about how the club prepares for tournaments, their outstanding accomplishments, and how they went out to achieve so much in such a short amount of time.

tncountryfan / Flickr/Creative Commons

Nearly nine out of ten Ohio third graders have passed the state’s third grade reading test, which allows them to move on to fourth grade—but Dayton scored among the worst in the state.

Eighty-eight percent of the 110,000 kids who took the test statewide passed this spring. That’s up from a little over 63 percent who passed the test in the fall.

Ohio’s Democratic Candidate for Governor is calling on Republican Governor John Kasich to halt the third grade guarantee. He also wants more money for public education.

Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald told members of the state’s largest teachers union that there are things state leaders need to do to help public education be successful in Ohio.

Michael Kellen

A local group has asked Dayton public schools for a moratorium on out of school suspensions. Racial Justice now presented their request at a school board meeting last night.  

According to the group, Black students accounted for 80% of school suspensions in 2011.

Professor Vernellia Randall with the University of Dayton is co-founder of Racial Justice now. She says removing students from the school system for non-violent offenses sets up an unfavorable pattern..

School districts throughout the Miami Valley are working under different rules when it comes to making up snow days.
Flickr Creative Commons User Christina's Play Place

The Ohio House has held off taking a formal vote on a plan to let schools take up to four additional days off this year because of the season's extreme weather.

At issue is a disagreement over how many days to allow. House Speaker Bill Batchelder says members plan to take an additional week to continue to work on the number of days in the proposal and review its costs.

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

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