Education

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for May 19, 2013 including the following stories:

- In this week's PoliticsOhio, Jerry Kenney speaks with former Ohio House member Seth Morgan about the recent news that the IRS targeted conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status.

- Study: Ohio Superintendents Support the Common Core, by Emily McCord.

- The Great Flood: Out of Devastation Comes Innovation

Study: Ohio Superintendents Support the Common Core

May 19, 2013

A new study released Friday by the Fordham institute gauged Ohio superintendents' views on education reform in the state. One notable finding is that the majority of Superintendents support the Common Core, an initiative that has caused some controversy. Emily McCord spoke to the Fordham Institutes' Terry Ryan and the lead researcher on the project, Steve Farkas and began by asking Terry about the purpose of the study.

A new study released this week gauges the views of Ohio school superintendents on education reform in the state. As Emily McCord reports from Ohio Public Radio member station WYSO, it finds superintendents favor the initiative known as the Common Core.

Some conservative Ohio lawmakers and some faith leaders who generally support conservative causes want to put millions of additional dollars into more preschool for at risk children, something a lot of Democrats have championed in the past, and the push is on at the Ohio Statehouse to get more money for early childhood education.

School safety was the top topic for the state board of education, which hoped to learn about how to make buildings, staff and students more secure. But Ohio Public Radio’s Karen Kasler reports, one idea that’s been making the rounds isn't likely to move forward

“Twenty-two seconds from the time the shooter shot the first bullet till the time he exited the school building. Twenty-two seconds.”

Early childhood education may get a boost in the state budget. A group of lawmakers are meeting today to discuss adding a voucher program that will help eligible children attend private preschools. The Education Finance Subcommittee will be hearing testimony from local educators, business people and community leaders. There are 130,000 children in Ohio eligible to attend government funded preschool programs. Fewer than half of them receive preschool services.  

The University of Dayton says its high number of alcohol violations among students has more to do with aggressive enforcement than excessive drinking.

The Dayton Daily News reports that UD's more than 3,500 alcohol violations over a three-year period outpaced much larger Ohio schools.

The 8,000-student university's disciplinary referrals for drinking trailed only the much-larger Ohio State University among the state's colleges from 2009 to 2011, the period for which the latest data is available.

Wittenberg University's Concerned Black Students group held its 45th annual Walkout event this week. The event commemorates a 1969 incident when 38 of the school's 45 black students walked off campus when they alleged the university failed to address their concerns about unequal treatment.

Early Childhood Education Programs Impacted by Sequestration

Apr 18, 2013

Head Start is an early childhood education program that serves low-income and at-risk families and families that have children with disabilities. The recent sequestration is requiring Head Start programs across the state to cut their funding by 5.3 percent and that could mean big changes to the services it provides. Barbara Haxton is the Executive Director of the Ohio Head Start Association. She says that next year the Miami Valley could lose as many as 300 slots for children in local Head Start programs. 

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for April 14, 2013 including the following stories:

-- Dayton Police Chief: Aerial Surveillance For Crime, Not Spying, by Emily McCord

-- Canal's Street's Montgomery Says Venue Has Been His Life, by Jerry Kenney

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