Education

Divestment As A Strategy To Fight Climate Change

Aug 10, 2015
Barley / Flickr Creative Commons

Several universities and other institutions around the country have made headlines in the past year or two by deciding to eliminate all investments in fossil fuels.  Is this action a serious step toward mitigating the effects of climate change, or just a public relations ploy?  University of Dayton professor Bob Brecha has more during this week’s climate commentary.

Library books
Dan Goldblatt, WFIU Public Radio / Flickr/Creative Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The number of school librarians in Ohio has dropped by nearly half in the past 10 years despite studies showing students do better when those jobs are filled.

Ohio Department of Education data shows 923 school librarians in the 2013-2014 school year, down 43 percent from 1,628 in the 2004-05 school year.

Former Fairborn Primary School teacher, Scott Ervin, used his disciplinary skilles to work with the school's toughest kids.
Jerry Kenney

Scott Ervin has served as an educator for 15 years. But his love for teaching has been overshadowed by recent changes and mandates from the Ohio Department of Education. So much so that he recently resigned his teaching position at Fairborn Primary School. Ervin penned his frustrations in a recent editorial for the Washington Post.

Officials Say State DOE Threw F Grades Out Of Evaluation

Jul 15, 2015
The Ohio Departmente. of Education is pushing for updated safety plans for schools around the state
Ohio Department of Education

State school board members have accused the Ohio Department of Education of breaking the law by throwing failing grades for online schools out of a charter school evaluation.

The Plain Dealer in Cleveland reports that officials confirmed Tuesday that School Choice Director David Hansen left failing grades for those schools out of the evaluations of charter school oversight agencies. The omission boosted the rating of two oversight agencies.

Ohio Budget Passes Senate, Heads To House For Friday Vote

Jun 25, 2015

State senators on Thursday passed a sweeping $71.2 billion, two-year budget that provides an income tax cut for Ohioans, funds public schools and seeks to change health care policies.
 
The House is planning to vote on the measure Friday. The deadline for Republican Gov. John Kasich to sign the bill into law is Tuesday. Some things to know as the measure moves toward his desk:
 
     EDUCATION:
 

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

There will likely be a funding increase for K-12 public education in the next budget, since lawmakers scrapped Gov. John Kasich’s proposal that would have resulted in less money for half the state’s more than 600 school districts.

 

Both the House and Senate budgets ensure that no district will get less money in the next two years than they got this year. Republican Sen. Chris Widener says Senators put a lot more money into public schools.

 

DECA Prep Five-Year Study To Focus On Parent Involvement

Jun 23, 2015
DECA Prep

Officials with Dayton Early College Academy Prep hope to secure state funding to start a five-year pilot program that studies the link between parental involvement and student achievement. DECA Prep Superintendent Judy Hennessey says the focus will be on kids in kindergarten through third grade. She says that’s the time when students could fall behind if they aren’t receiving enough support at home.

Schools May Be Missing Out On Casino Revenue

Jun 16, 2015
State Sen. Bill Coley says over the past three years, the lost tax revenue amounts to roughly $165 million.
Erik Drost / Flickr Creative Commons

 When Ohio voters gave the "okay" for casinos to hit the state more than five years ago, there was a catch. Operators would have to pay a 33 percent tax on their revenue, calculated by subtracting "promotional credits" and payouts from their overall earnings. A chunk of that money then would be funneled to local governments and schools. One state senator thinks the current equation means districts are losing big.

 

Dayton, DPS Offering Incentive To New Teachers

Jun 12, 2015
Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

First-year teachers in the Dayton Public School District could receive a $1,000 stipend to live and work within Dayton city limits.

The incentive is part of the City of Learners initiative launched by Mayor Nan Whaley and DPS earlier this year. There’s a need for high-qualified teachers in the district, which is expecting mass retirements over the next few years--some due to changes in the state’s retirement system. Competition with other charter and private schools in Dayton also affects hiring.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

The State Senate has released its version of Ohio's budget. The chamber plans to send $71.3 billion over two years, which is about one billion less than both the House and Gov. John Kasich's proposed spending plans. 

Senate President Keith Faber of Celina is happy with his caucus’ proposal – which he says has a smaller bottom line than the previous two budget plans. Tax cuts are the big feature in the proposal.  

“We are continuing today to build on our commitment to fund what matters and return to the taxpayers what’s not essential,” Faber said.

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