Education

Ohio Budget Passes Senate, Heads To House For Friday Vote

Jun 25, 2015

State senators on Thursday passed a sweeping $71.2 billion, two-year budget that provides an income tax cut for Ohioans, funds public schools and seeks to change health care policies.
 
The House is planning to vote on the measure Friday. The deadline for Republican Gov. John Kasich to sign the bill into law is Tuesday. Some things to know as the measure moves toward his desk:
 
     EDUCATION:
 

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

There will likely be a funding increase for K-12 public education in the next budget, since lawmakers scrapped Gov. John Kasich’s proposal that would have resulted in less money for half the state’s more than 600 school districts.

 

Both the House and Senate budgets ensure that no district will get less money in the next two years than they got this year. Republican Sen. Chris Widener says Senators put a lot more money into public schools.

 

DECA Prep

Officials with Dayton Early College Academy Prep hope to secure state funding to start a five-year pilot program that studies the link between parental involvement and student achievement. DECA Prep Superintendent Judy Hennessey says the focus will be on kids in kindergarten through third grade. She says that’s the time when students could fall behind if they aren’t receiving enough support at home.

Schools May Be Missing Out On Casino Revenue

Jun 16, 2015
State Sen. Bill Coley says over the past three years, the lost tax revenue amounts to roughly $165 million.
Erik Drost / Flickr Creative Commons

 When Ohio voters gave the "okay" for casinos to hit the state more than five years ago, there was a catch. Operators would have to pay a 33 percent tax on their revenue, calculated by subtracting "promotional credits" and payouts from their overall earnings. A chunk of that money then would be funneled to local governments and schools. One state senator thinks the current equation means districts are losing big.

 

Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
Paradox 56 / Flickr Creative Commons

First-year teachers in the Dayton Public School District could receive a $1,000 stipend to live and work within Dayton city limits.

The incentive is part of the City of Learners initiative launched by Mayor Nan Whaley and DPS earlier this year. There’s a need for high-qualified teachers in the district, which is expecting mass retirements over the next few years--some due to changes in the state’s retirement system. Competition with other charter and private schools in Dayton also affects hiring.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

The State Senate has released its version of Ohio's budget. The chamber plans to send $71.3 billion over two years, which is about one billion less than both the House and Gov. John Kasich's proposed spending plans. 

Senate President Keith Faber of Celina is happy with his caucus’ proposal – which he says has a smaller bottom line than the previous two budget plans. Tax cuts are the big feature in the proposal.  

“We are continuing today to build on our commitment to fund what matters and return to the taxpayers what’s not essential,” Faber said.

Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
Paradox 56 / Flickr Creative Commons

 COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio charter school superintendent, a school board chairman and an education consultant suspected of bribing them in exchange for a contract have been convicted of federal charges.

Big Change Coming For Next Year’s Round Of PARCC Tests

May 22, 2015

A consortium of state education leaders have voted to make a big change to the standardized test known as the PARCC. The PARCC’s Governing Board, which includes state education commissioners and superintendents from around the country, has decided to scale back on testing to just one window late in the year. This year there were two testing periods, with the first in February.

Melissa Cropper, president of the Ohio Federation of Teachers, said the two-window system did not leave a lot of time for actual instruction.

College students from around the state are telling Senators at the Statehouse to put more need based funding for students in their upcoming budget proposal.

Just a few days ago, Rachael Collyer graduated from Ohio State University.  And now, when many students are thinking about their future, she’s worried about paying off about $27,000 in student loans. She wants state lawmakers to provide some debt relief for students like her in the upcoming state budget.

Civic Enterprises
Civic Enterprises

A report was released this week by Civic Enterprises – a public policy group that finds graduation rates in the US have climbed over the last decade. The report is called Building a Grad Nation:Update to the Nation.

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