Economy

The fund that pays benefits to unemployed workers in Ohio is more than a billion dollars in debt to the federal government, but there may be a fix in the works.

Most states borrowed from the feds to pay jobless benefits during the recession. Zach Schiller at the think tank Policy Matters Ohio has been studying this for years, and recently put out another warning about it.

“While we’ve reduced it somewhat, the natural financing of the unemployment system is not going to be enough to repay that debt, much less build a new reserve for the next recession.”

Measuring Ohio’s Economic Changes Under Gov. John Kasich

Oct 31, 2014
Zack McCarthy / Flickr

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is running a relatively low-profile reelection campaign. He’s not debating on TV. Instead, he’s betting his record on the economy will bring in the votes he needs.

When making his case for reelection, Kasich will point to the big headline numbers in Ohio’s jobs story, as he did in an interview with Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler.

Children's Defense Fund - Report Generator

An annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Children’s Defense Fund Ohio finds that despite a perceived economic recovery, child poverty remains a serious issue in the state of Ohio.

Dawn Wallace-Pascoe is the Kids Count Project Manager with CDF Ohio.  She gave us an overview of the report and what it means for kids in Ohio.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A citizens’ group has gathered 1,700 signatures on a petition asking the Target store in Trotwood not to close. Target recently announced that its Trotwood and Middletown stores in the Dayton area are set to shut down May 3.

Trotwood city council member Bruce Kettelle compared the news from Target to a break-up.

(WYSO/Lewis Wallace)

Miami County is preparing for a major tour stop by UK folk stars Mumford and Sons this weekend. The city of Troy, population 25,000, is anticipating an influx of 40,000 people and at least $12 million in new revenues for the region.

By Wednesday, downtown Troy was already overrun with semi trucks, workers, and, believe it or not, mustaches. Inside Hittle’s Jewelry, owner Jenny Nimer showed off her display of mustachioed jewelry, complete with what she called “bling.”

Home sales in Ohio moved up for the 25th straight month and that’s seen by some as a positive indicator for the state’s economy.  

In July more than 13,ooo homes sold; a 25.8 percent increase over sales reported a year ago at that time, and July’s highest sales figures since 2005.

More good news for the Ohio economy: The state's per-capita income rose at one of the fastest rates in the nation last year.

That's according to an analysis by The Dayton Daily News, which says the statistic is a sign that the state's economy is recovering more quickly than that most of the country.

Per-capita personal income includes all earnings such as wages, dividends, interest income and rents. In Ohio, it rose by 1.7 percent to $39,289 between 2011 and 2012. That was a larger increase than all but two other states.

Nearly 1 in 4 Ohio mortgages are underwater, according to numbers from real estate data company Zillow Inc. US Senator Sherrod Brown says that’s why he’s introducing legislation to speed up what’s known as short sales.

Last week we reported that state officials saw the number of new business filings in Ohio as a positive sign of economic growth for the state.  Applications to do business in Ohio last year reached more than 88,000.  

Although most officials will tell you that the economy is far from where it needs to be in terms of a full recovery, business leaders say there are a number of positive signs for our state and local economies.  Jason Antonick is Manager of Business and Economic Development at Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce.

Longtime Ohio Republicans Talk Fiscal Cliff

Nov 20, 2012

Two longtime Republicans from Ohio are talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. That's a package of tax increases and spending cuts that will take effect if Congress doesn't act.

Former U.S. Senator George Voinovich says he SUPPORTS tax increases on the wealthy.

But Voinovich, who was governor of the Buckeye State in the 90s, says his willingness to compromise comes with strings attached.

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