WYSO

Downtown Dayton

Buildings on the northeastern corner of the junction of Fourth and Jefferson Streets in downtown Dayton, Ohio, United States. This block is part of the Fire Blocks Historic District, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic
Nyttend

A Dayton redevelopment project has received $4.5 million in state historic tax credits today.

Developers will use the credits to restore two buildings in Dayton’s Fire Blocks District, near the center of downtown. In another award, Grandview Hospital received $106,000 in allocated credits.

The Elks Building and the David Building will be converted into apartments, shops and restaurants, while Grandview will receive housing updates for employees and students.

Celebrating year three of operation, the Third on Third outdoor eclectic market has returned for another season on East Third Street in downtown Dayton.  This year a partner event, Third Sundays on Front Street, launches pairing art with the market.  Peter Benkendorf and Krysten Smith visited the WYSO studios to chat about both events and the revitalization of East Third Street. 

Third on Third and Third Sundays at Front Street will be Sunday, May 15th, 11am-4pm on East Third Street.

Downtown Dayton may be getting a new hotel for the first time since the 1970s.

Woodard Development is set to construct a Fairfield Inn in the Water Street District. The area already houses residential developments and office space.

Tony Kroeger, Dayton’s City Planner, said the district has seen a lot of new development recently.   

“The fact that somebody’s willing to make an investment like this in Downtown certainly would be a sign of confidence,” said Kroeger.

A mostly empty building, 40 West Fourth St, with a reflection in its windows of part of the empty Dayton Arcade.
Carey Scheer / WYSO

Dayton’s first modern skyscraper stands at 40 West Fourth Street. It’s all glass on the outside, stretching 22 stories into the sky. The lobby is brightly lit, but it’s eerily empty, aside from a bored looking security guard. He tells me there’s only two businesses left in this building, leaving 20 totally empty floors.

Dayton Arcade Interior, 2013
Tom Gilliam / http://instagram.com/daytongram

Dayton City Commission has voted to put money towards upkeep for the historic downtown Dayton Arcade, and an out-of-state investor is joining in.

Dayton Metro Library Operations Center Gives New Life To Hauer Music Building

Sep 16, 2015
An employee installs cameras on exterior of new north stair tower at the Hauer Music Building
Marika Snider / WYSO

A new Dayton Public Library Operations Center is about to open in the former Hauer Music Building. In 2012, the passage of the $187 million Libraries for a Smarter Future levy began an enormous construction and remodeling campaign of the entire Dayton Metro Library System.

The rotunda section of the Arcade is in urgent need of repair. downtown dayton
David Bohardt / Arcade Task Force

The downtown Dayton Arcade has been unoccupied for more than twenty years now.

But 52-year-old Daytonian Aquetta Knight remembers a time when it was hopping.

“Everybody I knew was down there,” she says. “They were the good old days.”

Her dad was a shoe repairman in the Arcade, which also housed a fresh meat market, fresh fish, a popcorn store and a grocery. She’s like a lot of residents who want nothing more than to see it open back up.

The old Delco building in downtown Dayton, largely offline since the 1980s, is being converted into apartments. Developers look out on the future courtyard.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Three Dayton-area buildings, including the former Delco building next to Fifth Third Field, have been approved for historic preservation tax credits from the state. The credit gives private developers a tax break on rehabilitation costs for historic buildings.

Bike Miami Valley

Downtown Dayton’s new bike share program kicked off this month and it has already exceeded expectations. 

Chris Buck with Bike Miami Valley says the bike share numbers in the first few weeks have been high.

“In the first 24 days we saw over 4600 rides taken,” he said. “We know that we have over 1080 unique users so people have really embraced the bike share concept and have gone full-bore at it.”

A sketch of the future Water Street District in downtown Dayton on the riverfront.
Courtesy of developers Crawford Hoying and Woodard.

The ground was officially broken at Dayton’s Water Street apartment development Thursday morning. The 215-unit luxury apartment complex is part of an investment partnership between Columbus-based Crawford Hoying and Dayton based Woodard Real Estate. The original plan called for fewer units and less money invested, but the project has expanded since it was first announced.

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