Dayton Air Show

Photo of NAHA display

The factory where the Wright Brothers built their original plane will produce another airplane soon - a new replica of the Wright-B Flyer is scheduled to take flight in 2016.

The announcement came from Jay Jabour—president of Wright “B” Flyer, Inc. standing just outside the Wright Company factory in Dayton.

Jabour told the attending press, “The opportunity to build a look-a-like of the 1911 airplane in the original 1911 factory is really exciting.”

An airplane at the Vectren Dayton Airshow, a yearly event at the Dayton Airport.
eawortman / Flickr/Creative Commons

Janet Bednarek, a professor of history at the University of Dayton, specializes in airports—and in the idea of the airport as a hub for economic growth. She thinks airports bring a lot of potential, but there are also limitations; ultimately, she says, corporations decide where they want to go, and an “if you build it, they will come” approach can backfire.

“Dayton has always tried to capitalize on the fact that we’re at the intersection of two major interstates,” says Bednarek. “It just seems like the ability to capitalize on that hasn’t seemed to happen yet.”

courtesy of Museum of Flight in Seattle, WA, USA

Earlier this summer, a pilot named Charlie Schwenker and a wing-walker named Jane Wicker were killed at the Vectren Air Show in Dayton, a tragedy in the midst of an event laden with history. Air Shows as public events began more than 100 years ago. WYSO's aviation commentator Dan Patterson loves that colorful history full of spectacle and heroism.

According to the Ohio State Highway Patrol - pilot error was the cause of a crash at the Vectren Dayton Air Show last month.  Killed in the June 22nd accident were the plane’s owner, 44 year-old Jane Wicker – who was performing a wing walking stunt at the time - and the pilot 64 year-old Charlie Schwenker.

The report cites slow speed and a lack of lift, causing the plane to stall and then crash before thousands of spectators. Lt. Anne Ralston says the Patrol’s report is based on eye-witness accounts, video, and measurements taken at the crash site.

Federal officials continue to investigate the deadly air show crash on Saturday that took the lives of a wing walker and the pilot.

Thousands were watching the biplane at the Dayton Air Show as it glided through the sky then rolled over, crashed and exploded into flames.  It wasn't clear what had gone wrong.

The Dayton Daily News reports that The National Transportation Safety Board plans to release an initial report this week.  The exact cause of the accident may not be known for months.

Organizers of the Dayton Air Show expect smaller crowds this weekend, thanks to the Air Force Thunderbirds and other military support pulling out because of federal budget cuts.

The two-day show usually draws around 70,000 people and has a $3.2 million impact on the local economy. But the Thunderbirds precision jet team had to withdraw earlier this year because of federal cutbacks, along with military support from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The Dayton Air Show that has to make do without military participation because of federal budget cuts has added a Tuskegee Airmen exhibit and a restored World War II fighter plane.

The Dayton Air Show says a traveling custom-trailer theater with a panoramic screen will be at the June 22-23 show at Dayton International Airport. It will tell the story of the black airmen who overcame many obstacles to become the heroic "Red Tail Squadron" of World War II. They flew in P-51 Mustang planes, and the air show says one will fly at the show.

Federal budget cuts mean there will be no military presence at the popular Dayton Air Show for the first time in the event's nearly four-decade history.

Military cuts already caused the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds to pull out of the show. Now the air show says there will be no other military fighter demonstrations or displays at all.

The Dayton Daily News reports there won't even be any of the typical personnel support from nearby Wright-Patterson Air Force Base at the June 22-23 event.

Air Show General Manager Brenda Kerfoot called it "unprecedented."

The U.S. Air Force's grounding of its Thunderbirds jet demonstration team means the planes won't be headlining this summer's Dayton Air Show.

It's not a surprise. The Air Force earlier announced that it planned to ground the Thunderbirds April 1 if a federal budget deal wasn't reached.

Organizers of the popular Dayton Air Show made the Thunderbirds' cancelation official in a release Thursday.

The air show is scheduled to go on June 22 and 23 with 14 other aerial acts.

Air Force Cuts Could Impact Dayton Air Show

Jan 24, 2013

The Air Force announced cuts at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base this week to address budget uncertainty at the federal level. AS WYSO’s Emily McCord reports reductions to non essential flying could impact the popular Dayton Air Show.

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