civil rights

Arts & Culture
7:01 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

Mad River Theater Works Presents: Everybody's Hero

The cast of Everybody's Hero
Credit courtesy of Mad River Theater Works

At the start of the summer of 1947, television was brand new, the sound barrier had not been broken, and baseball was a white man’s game. By the time the fall arrived, all that had changed. President Truman addressed the nation for the first time on TV, Chuck Yeager flew faster than any man ever had, and Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to play major league baseball. 

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Rediscovered Radio
6:30 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Changing the Course of Civil Rights in Yellow Springs 50 Years Ago This Week

Concerned citizens began picketing in front of Gegner Barber Shop in Yellow Springs when the owner refused to provide services to African Americans.
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

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Community Voices
12:29 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

We Have a Dream

Participants in We Have a Dream recording at the WYSO studios

I was only 2 years old in August of 1963, when those 250 thousand people converged on Washington.  They traveled by car and train and chartered bus.  Some just walked or hitchhiked.  They came from all over the country.

Early in the day, at the Washington Monument, Bob Dylan and Joan Baez lead the crowds in singing "We Shall Overcome," and they proceeded to march peacefully to the foot of the Lincoln Memorial for more music and speeches.  Mahalia Jackson sang, as she often did at Dr. King's request, and then Dr. King came to the podium.

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Arts & Culture
4:04 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Cincinnati Museums to Merge in Money-Saving Effort

The Cincinnati Museum Center and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center are merging in an effort to prevent the civil rights institution from closing its doors.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that the merger will allow the Freedom Center to close a $1.5 million annual budget hole and the Museum Center to increase efforts to pay $8 million debt.  About 15 jobs will be eliminated.

The Museum Center houses a history museum, a children's museum and a natural history and a science museum.  The Freedom Center will be its fourth wholly owned subsidiary.

From the WYSO Archives
3:27 pm
Fri January 22, 2010

Dr. Martin Luther King's 1965 Commencement Speech at Antioch College

Jalyn Roe in front of the main building at Antioch College with a book she made as a child after hearing Dr. King's speech.
WYSO

In 1965 Dr, Martin Luther King gave the commencement speech at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Ten year-old Jalyn Jones Roe was there and that day changed her life. Roe's story will be heard as WYSO public radio presents Dr. King's address, in its entirety.

Roe lives in Yellow Springs today, and works with "The Springfield Community Empowerment Program," a faith based organization that works with at-risk youth and the disadvantaged in Springfield. Her work today, she believes, comes from the community values of diversity and inclusion that she learned in Yellow Springs