civil rights

Books
3:53 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Book Nook: My Mantelpiece - a Memoir of Survival and Social Justice, by Carolyn Goodman

Andrew Goodman was a young man from New York who went to Mississippi during the summer of 1964 to participate in the civil rights struggles that were taking place then in the South. Shortly after he arrived he vanished. Andrew and two other civil rights workers had been taken by members of the Ku Klux Klan and brutally murdered. Their bodies were found some time later.

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Community Voices
4:45 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Freedom Summer: Fifty Years and Remembering

50 years ago this month, volunteers from across the country came to Oxford, Ohio to prepare for a pivotal event in the civil rights movement. Dave Barber created this story for WYSO'S Community Voices. 

“We hope to send into Mississippi this summer upwards of 1000 teachers, ministers and students from all around the country who will engage in what are we calling freedom schools, community center programs, voter registration activities, in general a program designed to open Mississippi to the country.”    Bob Moses  1964     

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Around the Miami Valley
10:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Call & Response: Malcolm X's Legacy In Dayton and Beyond

Slain civil rights leader Malcom X would have been 89 years old on May, 19th.

Call and Response is an African American produced show about the Miami Valley. It is a program that stimulates and engages the core WYSO audience while speaking especially to listeners of color. Call and Response is an opportunity to share in the collective history of the multicultural community we call home.

Host Daryl Ward is one of the most recognizable voices and community leaders in Southwest Ohio. Dr. Ward lives and works in West Dayton, where he serves as pastor of the Omega Baptist Church in Dayton View.

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Arts & Culture
7:01 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

Mad River Theater Works Presents: Everybody's Hero

The cast of Everybody's Hero
Credit courtesy of Mad River Theater Works

At the start of the summer of 1947, television was brand new, the sound barrier had not been broken, and baseball was a white man’s game. By the time the fall arrived, all that had changed. President Truman addressed the nation for the first time on TV, Chuck Yeager flew faster than any man ever had, and Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to play major league baseball. 

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Rediscovered Radio
6:30 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Changing the Course of Civil Rights in Yellow Springs 50 Years Ago This Week

Concerned citizens began picketing in front of Gegner Barber Shop in Yellow Springs when the owner refused to provide services to African Americans.
courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College

The controversy began in 1960 at the Gegner Barber Shop located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. The owner, Lewis Gegner, claimed “I don’t know how to cut their (Negro’s) hair” and refused to provide service to African Americans.

By 1960, the Antioch Committee for Racial Equality (ACRE) and the Antioch Chapter of the NAACP were successful in desegregating other businesses in the Village of Yellow Springs. But Gegner refused even after being fined for violating the local anti-discrimination ordinance.

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