Arts & Culture

Change Your Hue Blues Concert is an evening of food, music and fundraising in support of the United Methodist Children's Home.  Hall of Fame Blues host Shakin Dave Hussong joined Niki Dakota in the studio and WYSO Resource Board member and event co-organizer Don Hiyashi via phone to talk about the music and the event

Change Your Hue Blues Concert is May 2nd in Columbus.

A casual conversation at a gig lead to the eventual formation of a band.  Jason Trout and Andrea Dawn Courts perform as The Touchy Feelys and visited the WYSO studios for a live set on Kaleidoscope.  The duo chatted with host Juliet Fromholt about their writing process, performing together and more.

The Touchy Feelys will perform on Saturday, May 2nd at Jimmie's Ladder 11 with Whiskey for Kids and Charles Hartman. 

Photo by Chris Glass

Performing under the name R. Ring, Kelley Deal and Mike Montgomery are about to embark on their spring tour in support of two upcoming split 7 inch EPs.  The duo visited the WYSO studios for a live set on Kaleidsocope and talked with host Juliet Fromholt about writing, recording and more.

R. Ring will perform on Thursday, April 30th at Canal Public House with Smug Brothers, Good English, and Pale Angels. For more tour dates, visit

Conrad Balliet reads Robert Paschell's poem, "Early Spring."

Miami Valley StoryCorps: Millie Smith & Rhine McLin

Apr 29, 2015
Rhine McLin and Millie Smith
StoryCorps

On Miami Valley StoryCorps we bring you conversations between local people who went to the StoryCorps booth in Dayton last spring. Today, we hear Millie Smith interview her mentor, Rhine McLin. McLin is a third generation politician. She was also the first female mayor of Dayton and the first African-American woman elected to the Ohio State Senate.

This interview was edited by Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds.

Cathy Essinger reads her poem, "At Twig's End."

The Whiskey Shambles kicked off the Hall Pass Program for 2015 with a live trio set in the WYSO studios. The band talked with Shakin' Dave about the blues and various other musical styles, live performances and audience, and much more.

Janeal Ravndal reads Carol Stoner's poem, "Estuary Arms."

Rita Coleman reads two of her poems about love.

Late last year I received an advance copy of a novel that was written by an author who was unknown to me. This is not an uncommon circumstance. What was unusual was that this book had a press release which indicated that there was a lot of buzz about it among some people who work in publishing. They were all abuzz about this novel "The Girl on the Train." So I read it and then I got it. I understood.

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