Arts & Culture

Some of us read horror novels because we want to feel scared without having to worry about our fears. Then there's a genre of novels that are so gnarly and tough that they could make  readers scream. Our screams would be sympathetic ones because the characters in these stories can elicit our emotions. As they go about the gritty business of their tattered lives we might feel like screaming just to release some of the tensions these tales can build up. Sometimes life isn't pretty. We know that. That's why we read books about these kinds of things.

WYSO has aired lots of different kinds of music in its 56-year history, but folk music, the soundtrack of the 1960s, is particularly well represented in our audio archives. Students and volunteers recorded many folk concerts and festivals at Antioch College and elsewhere over the decades. Various members of the Seeger family - perhaps the most prominent family in American folk music in the late 20th century - are found frequently in our collection.

Hazy and the Rugged Child combine elements of rock and roll, r&b, jazz and more into their own unique "mash-up" style of music.  The band visited the WYSO studios for a live set and talked with Kaleidoscope Juliet Fromholt about finding their sound, performing live and more.

Hazy and the Rugged Child will perform at a benefit show on October 26th at Halloween Express.

Epic-Con Ohio combines elements of sci-fi, horror, wrestling, gaming, and car shows for a two-day convention in downtown Dayton.  Kaleidoscope host Juliet Fromholt spoke with Epic Con promoter Sheri Yarbrough about the upcoming event.

Epic Con is October 24 and 25th at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds.

Janeal Ravndal reads Aimee Noel's poem, "Baking Uranium."

Now and then a book will come along that is so darned wonderful I can hardly believe it. Neverhome by Laird Hunt is just such a book. Here's my review that ran in the Cox Ohio newspapers:

One of the great pleasures that can be obtained from reading works of fiction are the joys of discovering books and writers that were previously unknown to us. Recently, an acquaintance of mine said that I might like a new novel called Neverhome by Laird Hunt. I had never heard of this writer.

The Kent State University Press recently reissued a new edition of Robert Fogarty's classic study of a religious sect, the House of David, a once thriving community based in Benton Harbor, Michigan. In "The Righteous Remnant - the House of David" Fogarty traces the origins of this group all the way back to the 17th Century in what was known as the "Anglo-Israelite millennial tradition" and in the prophecies of a mystic named Joanna Southcott.

Steve Broidy reads his poem, "By The Light."

Janeal Ravndal reads Joy Schwab's poem, "Music."

Congressman Mack Flies Around The World In 1951

Oct 10, 2014
courtesy of the Mack family

For today's aviation commentary, Paul Glenshaw has an unlikely story. See if you can imagine this: a congressman risks his life for a self funded world peace mission. The Smithsonian loans an airplane from its collection for a solo round- the- world flight. A pilot makes that flight and does nothing to exploit his achievement. Yet, as Glenshaw tells us, all these things happened, in 1951, to one Peter Mack.

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