All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4-6:30pm and Weekends, 5-6pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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On Monday, the Beavercreek city council passed a six-month ban on medical marijuana. The ordinance prohibits the city from granting any permits to grow, process, or sell marijuana until January. It doesn’t ban the use of medical marijuana at home.

 

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And now to Philadelphia where our co-host Audie Cornish is at the Democratic National Convention.

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Donald Trump on Wednesday called for Russia to hack Hillary Clinton's email and recover messages from her tenure as secretary of state. His comments followed reports that U.S. officials believe Russian hackers stole emails from the Democratic National Committee and arranged for their release.

Reporter Nancy Klingener takes NPR to the annual Underwater Musical Festival in the Florida Keys, as part of All Things Considered's feature on off-kilter summer festivals. A system pipes a fully submerged dance party below the sea. There are mermaids, too.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Trevor Burbank is single, 27 years old, and has been house hunting in Nashville for the last year.

"My rent's going up in August, so I have to figure out what I'm doing," he says.

The last time Burbank looked for a place was five years ago. He decided to use his down payment to start a business instead.

"There was a house that I really liked that was going for $60,000, and I saw the house being sold in the past few months for just shy of $300,000," Burbank says.

The American Cheese Society will begin proctoring its next Certified Cheese Professional Exam in Des Moines, Iowa, on Wednesday, during the group's annual conference. The rigorous test is only in its fifth year, but nearly 600 people have passed it already. Industry experts say the exam is necessary because of the evolving standards in the growing American cheese business.

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