Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

The rotunda section of the Arcade is in urgent need of repair. downtown dayton
David Bohardt / Arcade Task Force

The downtown Dayton Arcade has been unoccupied for more than twenty years now.

But 52-year-old Daytonian Aquetta Knight remembers a time when it was hopping.

“Everybody I knew was down there,” she says. “They were the good old days.”

Her dad was a shoe repairman in the Arcade, which also housed a fresh meat market, fresh fish, a popcorn store and a grocery. She’s like a lot of residents who want nothing more than to see it open back up.

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

The Dayton City Commission has passed a controversial set of changes to the city’s source water protection program.

 

The current code regulates the chemicals around Dayton’s well fields, where most of Montgomery County’s drinking water comes from. Since the late 80s, the zoning code has legislated the amount of potentially hazardous substances that can be stored near the wells. A related regulation, which will remain in place, provides incentives for companies that had chemicals grandfathered in to reduce those chemicals.

 

From left to right, Bishop Richard Cox with SCLC, Attorney Michael Wright, and Patricia Martin, Dontae Martin's mother
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The family of a black man shot and killed by Montgomery County sheriff’s deputies last week is accusing the sheriff’s office of smearing his name, and calling for a thorough investigation.

The facts people agree on: last week two white deputies responded to a 911 call about a single-car crash in Harrison Township. At the end of it, 34-year-old Dontae Martin was dead.

Kristi Tanner with JobsOhio signs the Fuyao windshield at Carillon Historical Park.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A piece of glass produced at the Fuyao plant has been placed in the museum at Carillon Historical Park in Dayton.

Fuyao Chairman Cao Dewang grinned as kids from the Richard Allen Academy greeted him in Chinese at a crowded event at the museum. He was back in Dayton to celebrate the first windshields rolling off the line at the Moraine plant, where his company is spending more than $300 million to build what he says will be the biggest free-standing auto-glass factory in the world.

John Dixon works at  Access Dayton, one of the groups leading the push to move the stop. He says if he can't get a ride, a trip to the mall can take hours.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Local groups will recognize the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act or ADA this weekend with a protest. Activists say the Greater Dayton RTA bus stop at the Dayton Mall discriminates against people with disabilities.

The ADA is a federal law that’s led to a lot of the accommodations we’re used to today, like curb ramps and braille on elevators, but leaders with Access Dayton and Leaders for Equality and Action Dayton (LEAD) say the bus stop at the Dayton Mall violates the spirit of that law.

Darryl Fairchild (center) appeared at a demonstration outside city hall Wednesday. He is also a candidate for City Commission. water
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Activists are gearing up for another round of debate over the city of Dayton’s source water protection policy.

After more than a year of discussion, a compromise plan will go before the Dayton City Commission next week that would update the policy, which dates back to the late 1980s.

Montgomery County Commissioner Dan Foley (left) and Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce President Phil Parker spoke at a Thursday event re-launching the effort to merge city and county government.
Carey Scheer / WYSO

An effort to consolidate Montgomery County and Dayton city governments is facing resistance just as it gets off the ground. The idea is to imitate Louisville, Kentucky, which consolidated with its surrounding county in 2003. Proponents argue a merger would make Dayton larger and more powerful, and reduce competition for economic development between cities and towns.

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

A representative of the White House addressed advocates in Dayton Thursday about their efforts to make immigrants welcome, but immigration reform was the elephant in the room.

Dayton's officials are coming up against some unknowns in the budget process for next year.
Derek Jensen

Representatives from more than a dozen rust belt cities are gathering in Dayton Thursday to talk about immigration and economic development. The “Welcoming Economies” conference will include a keynote speech by Felicia Escobar, Special Assistant to the President for Immigration Policy.

Dayton Children's is also expanding in the city of Dayton, with this new patient tower.
Dayton Children's Hospital

The Dayton Children’s Hospital has announced a major expansion of its facilities in Springboro.

The hospital plans to spend nearly $50 million to more than double the size of its south suburban location to include a surgery center and emergency facilities.

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