Karen Kasler (Ohio Public Radio)

Karen Kasler is a lifelong Ohioan with a passion for broadcast reporting. She left her hometown of Lancaster for Otterbein College. As News Director at WCBE in Columbus in the 90s, she covered a variety of events, including the local impact of the Gulf War, the financial problems of the Columbus Public Schools and the trouble-ridden Ameriflora exhibition in 1992.

Karen was selected as a Fellow in the Kiplinger Master's Program for Mid-Career Journalists at The Ohio State University in 1994. After a brief stint at WBNS-TV in Columbus, she moved to Cleveland and became the afternoon drive anchor and assignment editor for WTAM-AM. Karen followed the demolition and rebuilding of Cleveland Browns Stadium, produced award-winning series on identity theft and the Y2K panic, covered the Republican National Convention in 2000 and the blackout of 2003, and reported annually from the Cleveland National Air Show each year, often going upside down in an aerobatic plane to do it. In 1999, she was a media witness to the execution of Wilford Berry, at the time the first man put to death since Ohio re-instated capital punishment. Karen frequently reported for ABC Radio News, and also co-produced an award-winning nationally-distributed documentary on the one-year anniversary of September 11, 2001, which featured her interview with Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge from the West Wing of the White House.

Since returning to Columbus, she's covered major elections and the controversies surrounding them, the "Coingate" scandal and the resignation of former Attorney General Marc Dann. She's also produced features on "green" business, STEM education, campaign ads, the elimination of the state's anti-smoking agency and a demolition derby involving farm equipment.

Each year she anchors the Bureau's live coverage of the governor's State of the State. She was a panelist for the gubernatorial and the US Senate debates in 2006 and the Attorney General's race in 2008, and has also been interviewed by NPR, by the BBC and by Brian Williams for NBC's "Nightly News".

Karen has been honored by the Association of Capitol Editors and Reporters, the Cleveland Press Club/Society of Professional Journalists, the Ohio Educational Telecommunications Commission, and holds a National Headliner Award. She's won several awards from the Ohio AP, and is a four-time winner of the AP's Best Broadcast Writing award. She was nominated for an Emmy in 2006 for hosting "The State of Ohio". She's currently the president-elect of the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters.

Karen joined the Bureau in March 2004. She’s reported for NPR, Marketplace and the Great Lakes Radio Consortium, and is a frequent guest on ONN’s “Capitol Square” , WVIZ’s “Ideas” and WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record”.

Karen is also an adjunct professor at Capital University in Columbus. Karen, her husband and their son Jack live on Columbus' northeast side.

Joe Halbach / Flickr Creative Commons

Cops around the country are asking the NFL to allow off-duty and retired police officers, deputies and other law enforcement officers to carry guns in stadiums. Jay McDonald with the Fraternal Order of Police of Ohio has sent a letter to the management of the Cincinnati Bengals and Cleveland Browns, asking them to rescind a two-year old policy that prevents off-duty and retired cops from carrying weapons into games.

Republican presidential contender Donald Trump is threatening to sue his fellow candidate, Republican Gov. John Kasich.  The Kasich super PAC New Day for America says it got a letter from Donald Trump’s lawyers, threatening legal action over a new ad that begins, "On the job training for president does not work."


Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The first piece of bipartisan legislation to come out of Gov. John Kasich’s task force on police action and community relations is out.  This first bill would require law enforcement agencies to come up with written policies on how fatal officer-involved shootings will be handled, and provides for outside officers to investigate those shootings.


Rep. Alicia Reece (D-Cincinnati) pointed to the recommendations of the task force created after the deaths of John Crawford of Dayton and Tamir Rice in Cleveland last year.


Jeff Weese / Flickr Creative Commons

Ohio’s corn and ethanol industry is fighting back at ads it says are misleading and funded by big oil.

The ad aired last week in Ohio, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont, and it says in part: “Mandating corn for ethanol doubles greenhouse gas emissions compared to gasoline over 30 years, and escalating mandates raise food costs and threaten the quality of the air we breathe. Mounting scientific evidence has revealed the inconvenient truth – increasing ethanol mandates can actually make things worse.”

Though Ohio voters soundly rejected a proposal to legalize marijuana, the group that brought it to the ballot says it’s pushing forward with its next proposal.

ResponsibleOhio has been working on what it calls the Fresh Start Act, which executive director Ian James said would allow for the elimination of records of non-violent marijuana convictions for offenses that will someday no longer be illegal.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger of southwest Ohio says there's support for medical marijuana.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The issue to legalize pot in Ohio may have failed, but the leading Republican in the House says he’s gotten the message that Ohioans support medical marijuana.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger of Clarksville in southwest Ohio says lawmakers will discuss how to permit marijuana for research and medical use in Ohio, but he warned it won’t come quickly.


After a decade of false starts, Ohio voters have overwhemingly approved new rules for drawing state legislative districts that aim to reduce partisan gerrymandering.

Issue 1 sailed to victory, thanks to bipartisan support and very little opposition. Catherine Turcer with Common Cause Ohio has been working for years to reform redistricting laws. “It’s like Christmas,” she said. “And the thing that’s exciting is that this is for all of us.”

National Atlas of the United States / Creative Commons/Wikimedia

Gov. John Kasich has set the dates for the special primary and election to find Congressman John Boehner’s replacement.


According to a news release, Secretary of State Jon Husted directed boards of elections for the counties in the 8th Congressional District to begin preparing.


The special primary for the seat will be held March 15 of the next year. It’ll be held in conjunction with the 2016 Presidential Primary Election. The special general election will be June 7.


Kasich for America / Wikipedia/Creative Commons

Gov. John Kasich was among 10 Republican presidential candidates on the debate stage Wednesday night.


This was Kasich’s chance to get more attention. He’s still struggling to gain traction is early voting states like New Hampshire and Iowa.


During his opening statement, the governor echoed his pre-debate rally comments telling voters he’s tired of the “nonsense” he’s heard from the other candidates.


The state has pushed back execution dates for a dozen condemned killers.

Ronald Phillips was set to die on January 21, but his execution has been pushed back almost a year, to January 12, 2017. His is the first of 12 execution dates to be delayed.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction says in a statement that it continues to try to find legal ways to get the supply of drugs it needs. Other states with lethal injections are having similar problems finding the drugs they use.