Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s Advisory Group on Law Enforcement Training is recommending some changes it says will improve policing statewide. This group wants some standards to determine who should get into training classes and increases training for officers statewide.

DeWine says there are few requirements for people who want to enroll in police officer training academics throughout the state.

WYSO

The Ohio House has passed a measure that would move the presidential primary in Ohio to March 15 instead of earlier in the month. The change is because of a Republican National Committee rule. It would not allow the state to have a winner-takes-all status on its primary votes if the election were held earlier in March.

But not all Republicans are happy with the move. Tom Zawistowski says many want proportional voting because it gives more conservative candidates an opportunity to win.

During the past decade, Ohio’s income tax has been cut several times. And it looks like it might be cut again as the Republican led legislature considers the state budget. But some lawmakers are questioning the value of those cuts.

Republican Finance Committee Chair Ryan Smith says it is important to cut income taxes, especially for small businesses. They would get another tax break under the house’s proposed budget.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Communities that still have red light cameras in operation right now are questioning part of the budget plan proposed by the Ohio House. There’s disagreement over a part of the bill designed to take away revenue that’s generated through those cameras.

Some cities are continuing to operate red light cameras while they sue over a new state law that restricts the usage of those devices. State Rep. Ron Maag says there’s a part of the newly proposed House budget that deals with those communities.

A new bill is being introduced at the Ohio Statehouse that would allow officiants to refuse to marry same sex couples in Ohio.

House Republican Ron Maag is the sponsor of a bill that would allow ministers and clergy members to refuse to perform marriage ceremonies that oppose their religious beliefs. But right now, that wouldn’t happen anyway since gay marriage is not legal in Ohio anyway.

A new bill has been introduced in the state legislature that would allow Ohioans to carry concealed guns without required training or a permit. But the bill is being met with resistance.

Jim Irvine, with the Buckeye Firearms Association, says the state should do what some others have done: scrap the permit requirement for handguns.

A Quinnipiac University Poll shows if the election were held today, Democratic Former Governor Ted Strickland would beat Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman by nine points in a head to head matchup.  And it’s worse when you throw in Independent voters.  They back Strickland by an 18 point margin. That’s something University of Akron Political Science Professor John Green says he didn’t expect.

Faith leaders and advocates for the poor are calling on the federal government to do something to reform payday lending.

An advocate for the homeless in Central Ohio says Ohio’s laws that crack down on payday lenders have been ineffective at curbing some of the predatory lending practices. Bill Faith says payday lenders are finding ways to get around those new laws by using other areas of Ohio’s lending laws.

“They have exploited those loopholes and we have tried multiple ways to close those loopholes,” he said.

casino, gambling
Adam Tinworth

Some state lawmakers say casino revenue hasn’t been as high as originally promised a few years ago when Ohio voters approved those casinos. So the lawmakers say they will introduce a bill that would rein in a tax break those casinos have been receiving.

Republican State Senator Bill Coley has a message for casino owners who he says have broken promises made to voters.

ohio.gov

The director of the state panel that regulates public utilities is stepping down from that role. But he won’t really be leaving the commission.

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Director Tom Johnson says personal reasons have led him to the decision to step down. But he does intend to stay on as a member of the commission. That term would end in four years. 

Johnson, a long time state lawmaker who became chairman last April, says he’ll stay in the top position until a replacement has been found. One of the leading contenders for that replacement could be Andre Porter.

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