Associated Press

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Office of Ohio Governor John Kasich

Republican Gov. John Kasich says he's focused on backing his party's congressional candidates this fall and won't talk about any support for a presidential candidate.
 

Kasich has declined to endorse GOP nominee Donald Trump.

Police say a man playing "Pokemon Go" in an Ohio park was robbed of his cellphone and shot three times. 
 
Columbus police say 26-year-old Gregory Wheeler and a woman were playing the smartphone game Tuesday night when a 14-year-old boy asked to use the phone to call his mother. 
 
Police say the teenager fled with the phone and Wheeler was first struck in the head by another person when he chased after the boy, then shot. Wheeler's condition wasn't immediately available Wednesday.
 

Army Corporal Charles "Perky" White Jr.
Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

The remains of a Korean War veteran who was captured in 1950 have been returned to his Ohio family, and he'll be buried Friday next to his parents.
 

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

New York's Hofstra University says it's honored to be called on to host the first 2016 presidential general election debate.

The Sept. 26 debate is moving to Hofstra after Wright State University withdrew as host Tuesday, citing rising security concerns and costs.

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced quickly that Hofstra would take over. The Hempstead, New York, university had agreed last year to serve as an alternate site. It hosted debates in 2012 and 2008.

Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones is encouraging staffers with licenses to carry to bring their weapons to work.

The Hamilton-Middletown Journal-News reports Jones also urged civilian employees to carry their weapons while operating any department vehicle away from headquarters.

Jones encouraged employees to carry their guns in a memo on Friday after recent attacks against police officers in other parts of the county. In the memo, Jones urged employees to plan their attire appropriately and carry their weapons discreetly when in public view.

Matt Shiffler Photography

Union Institute and University in Cincinnati has been awarded a $150,000 grant from an anonymous foundation that aims to help veterans earn their college degrees.

The grant will continue to fund living allowance stipends for honorably discharged, Pell Grant-eligible veterans working toward their bachelor's, master's or doctoral degrees at the school.

Geri Maples, Union's veterans services coordinator, says education is vital to veterans' transition into the civilian world.

A federal judge is deciding whether a young Ohio man's bond should be revoked as he awaits trial on a charge he tried to rush the stage at a Donald Trump rally.

Judge Sharon Ovington scheduled a hearing Monday afternoon on 22-year-old Thomas DiMassimo's bond. She earlier this month found that he violated conditions she set in March allowing him to be free under his own recognizance.

It wasn't clear what conditions he violated, but she ordered him to be electronically monitored and placed on home detention.

j.irvin1

Attorneys are asking whether Ohio's new medical marijuana law that bars employers from disciplining professionals from working with marijuana businesses applies to them.

Lawyers have submitted at least two requests for formal opinions on the matter to the state Supreme Court's Board of Professional Conduct. Only the state's high court can discipline licensed attorneys.

Attorneys want to know whether lawyers can use medical marijuana, own or operate medical marijuana businesses and represent marijuana cultivators, processors, dispensaries, patients and caregivers.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a city's challenge to new rules that require a police officer to be present when an automated camera is used to issue traffic tickets.

Springfield's argument against the law was rejected by a county judge last year and the city lost an appeal earlier this year. Nearby Dayton also has an appeal pending before the state's highest court.

CREDIT FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS USER SELBE B

State officials say a $48,000 audit of Ohio's food stamp program found roughly $31,000 in questionable costs, including benefits used by dead people and duplicate payments.

State Auditor Dave Yost released the findings of Ohio's $2.5 billion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Tuesday.

The audit found 36 cases where recipients received about $24,000 in benefits a year after they died.

Nearly $29 million was spent outside of Ohio, indicating that those recipients don't live in Ohio or that they're selling cards and benefits.

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