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Javier meets with an immigration lawyer to find out what his options are for going to college. latino
Jonathan Platt / WYSO

Outside Javier’s house in Twin Towers, we’re looking under the hood of my car, a ‘98 Camry. He teaches me the difference between a line-4 and a V-4 engine—I’m just concerned about whether my car is okay at this point.

“It looks pretty nice, yeah,” says Javier. Maybe he’s just being polite.

Steve Broidy reads his poem, "Patient Writing."

Here's another debut crime novel on the Minotaur imprint by a promising young author. Ausma Zehanat Khan has set her story in the Canadian city of Toronto. This is a story the author felt compelled to tell. The novel opens with a mysterious death. A man has died after falling off of a cliff one dark night. It looks like it was an accident. We know better, don't we?

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Communities that still have red light cameras in operation right now are questioning part of the budget plan proposed by the Ohio House. There’s disagreement over a part of the bill designed to take away revenue that’s generated through those cameras.

Some cities are continuing to operate red light cameras while they sue over a new state law that restricts the usage of those devices. State Rep. Ron Maag says there’s a part of the newly proposed House budget that deals with those communities.

Javier is a star student in Rick Seither's automotive class at David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center. But he's not sure whether he can go on to college.  latino
Jonathan Platt / WYSO

Inside a huge garage at the David H. Ponitz Career Technology Center, there are ten or so cars in different stages of being fixed, and about a dozen hydraulic lifts. Instructor Rick Seither calls his students over for a mini-lesson.

Conrad Balliet reads Kathy Austin's poem, "The Visitation."

Wayne Baker / WYSO

The largest structure in downtown Springfield, which was once home to one of the biggest publishing companies in the country is being demolished, but the project hasn't gone as planned as several court-ordered deadlines for the project have been missed.

This giant 900,000 square foot brick structure looks like a Lego building someone knocked down parts of. Back in the 1940s, Crowell-Collier Publishing used to print more than 20 million magazines per month here. By 1957, the company was in financial trouble and left the massive structure on High and Lowry Streets empty.

Miami Valley StoryCorps: Tahja Archie & Nava Archie

Apr 15, 2015
StoryCorps

On Miami Valley StoryCorps we bring you conversations between local people who went to the StoryCorps booth in Dayton last spring. Today we meet Tahja Archie, who visited the StoryCorps booth with her mother, Nava Archie. As part of their conversation about Tahja's sexuality, they talked about relationships, including Tahja's most recent one.

This interview was edited by Community Voices producer Allison Loy.

Wayne Baker / WYSO

A nationwide protest against mass incarceration came to Dayton Tuesday. It was one of about 30 rallies organized by the Stop Mass Incarceration Network.

More than 75 protesters showed up at Courthouse Square in downtown Dayton, and marched three city blocks holding signs and chanting. The group stopped traffic for a few minutes doing a die-in in front of the courthouse.
 

Anthony Roebuck, 23, helped organize the local rally.

graduation cap high school college
gsagri04 / Openclipart

The Graduating Latino series is looking at both the obstacles and successes of Latino families navigating the education system in the Miami Valley. But recent research from the Pew Research Center finds the story of Latinos and education in the U.S. is a rapidly changing one: in 2012, the percentage of Hispanic high school graduates who went on to college exceeded that of their white counterparts.

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