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HIllary Clinton speaking at the Ohio Democratic Party Legacy dinner
Statehouse News Bureau

The Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia is well underway and like Republicans last week in Cleveland, Democrats are doing their best to close a rift in the party.  This week, WYSO continues talking to convention delegates and attendees to get their take on what’s happening.

Susan Eacker, of Hamilton, is a Bernie Sanders delegate from Ohio’s 8th Congressional district. In this interview from Wednesday she says delegates may not come together by the end of the convention. First though - she says it's been a busy week.

UBUNTU Men's Chorus Presents Begin to Love

Jul 26, 2016
UBUNTU Men's Chorus

This week, Niki Dakota talks with Cathy Roma, director of the UBUNTU Men’s Chorus at the London Correctional Institution. UBUNTU’s first album, Begin to Love, was released last month.

Ubuntu is a Zulu word that, according to Roma, means “I am who I am in community—I exist in relationship.” The men in the choir, she says, “Want to be there for each other and learn about the world through each other.”

Bernie Sanders strongly endorses Hillary Clinton, but some of his followers aren't ready to follow.
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

The call for Democratic Party unity fell short last night as delegates backing Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton chanted each other down within minutes of the start of the first night of the DNC in Philadelphia.

It was a tough first day on the job for Cleveland Congresswoman Marcia Fudge.

Karen Kasler

One Ohio party leader who’s at the DNC as an elected delegate for Bernie Sanders says she’s very worried about the effect of the email scandal involving the outgoing Democratic Party chair. 

Former state Sen. Nina Turner of Cleveland is concerned. “The facade of unity is not going to carry out until some folks really start to address this issue and give voice to the issue.”

Liz West / Flickr Creative Commons

The speed of summer seemx to be accelerating with the heat of Dog Days. I rest in my yard, holding the day close, binding it together with what lies around me.

In my garden pond, the three-petaled flowers of the arrowhead opened overnight, a few days before they did last year. The yellow coneflowers are a week ahead of schedule.

The zinnias and the Shasta daisies I planted from seed are finally blossoming, bright oranges and reds joining the white phlox and the pinks of the petunias. The lilies are almost done blooming now.

Readers love to try to pigeonhole books and authors. So do reviewers. We seem to need to have some points of reference. Someone will claim that a writer is like Hemingway or Faulkner or heaven forbid, Cormac McCarthy. They want to have definable genres that people can recognize. This novel is crime fiction. That one is chick lit. Or maybe this is grit lit? Chick lit veering into grit lit?

Dayton Daily News, courtesy of Sam Dorf

When you hear “Russian ballet,” Dayton, Ohio probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. But on February 8, 1917, the Ballets Russes, a radical Russian dance company based in Paris, performed at the Victoria Theater. That was twenty years before Dayton had its own ballet company. Listener Sandra Harewood learned about the performance and asked WYSO Curious to investigate.

What was the Ballets Russes?

Eminent Domain is Becoming a Crucial, Controversial Part of the Gas Pipeline Boom

Jul 24, 2016
Farmer Mick Luber stands along the southern border of his property in eastern Ohio, where Marathon has begun installing a liquid natural gas pipeline.
Julie Grant / The Allegheny Front

If you’ve seen the movie The Graduate, you no doubt remember the classic scene where a businessman friend of Benjamin’s parents—anxious to talk about the kid’s future— approaches Dustin Hoffman’s character with “just one word” of advice.

That one word, of course, was “plastics.”

There was a “bright future” in plastics according to Mr. McGuire. And while The Graduate came out nearly 50 years ago, some parents in Pennsylvania today might also see a future for their kids in plastics.

Ohio's delegates are seated to the right of the stage.
Nick Castele / ideastream

The 2016 Republican National Convention has come to a close, and delegates are getting back to their districts.

Butler County Treasurer and Kasich Delegate, Nancy Nix, says this year’s convention felt much different from previous ones.

“There’s just so much, so much anger that I never felt last time," she said. "But four years ago, the establishment was in charge, everyone was unified. This time we’ve got a nationalist candidate, the establishment has been throw to the side.”

Nix says her experience has changed the way she views her place in the party.

Press photo

Ohio Senator Rob Portman endorsed Donald Trump months ago, but he’s been pretty muted in his support. That changed on Thursday.

At a speech to the Ohio delegation breakfast at the Republican National Convention, Portman offered more full-throated support for Trump, and used his name more often than speakers at the rest of the week’s  breakfasts combined.

He says Republicans know how to fix the economy as evidenced by what’s happened in Ohio.

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